PDA

View Full Version : A typical day in...



zeropointreference
5th February 2010, 01:31 AM
I find Scientology fascinating. While I've read a lot and have at least a vague understanding of what's going on, I've never really got a good picture what a typical day at "*" is. Like a typical day at Flag, Gold, any of the Orgs or Missions, in the Sea Org is or the VM's.

I was wondering if anyone would like to tell the story, as if telling if from the building, ship, or organization's standpoint what a typical day at one of those places would be like?

I welcome any level of detail. And if you do decide to reply but the place you want to talk about has already been done, please don't hesitate to tell your version. I am really interested to get a better picture of what the life of a Scientologist is like.

Thank you for your time and effort.

Dulloldfart
5th February 2010, 01:57 AM
Fair enough. Here's a typical mundane day at ITO (International Training Org) around 1993. I was a course supervisor. It's a less interesting day — no huge emergency going on.

I'd wake up at 7:10 in a men's dorm. There was a minute "bathroom" in the dorm, toilet and sink, shared by the guys in the dorm. Most of the time there were maybe 8 guys in the dorm, but only 4 or 5 who got up at the same time. We had morning time slots assigned, 6 minutes each, to avoid squabbles (we arranged this schedule ourselves, it wasn't some order from above). So I'd use my 6 minutes to wash, shave etc. Then get dressed in my uniform, walk outside and around the corner, and get on a Sea Org bus with the rest of the guys. Then a ten minute drive through Hollywood, off the bus, upstairs in the Hollywood Guarantee Building 6th floor for breakfast, fairly leisurely (15 minutes or so). Then muster at 8:00 or 8:15, whenever it was. Roll-call to make sure we're all there, any special announcements from the CO, then off to post.

I was a staff courses sup. I was exceptionally good (fast and accurate) at calling roll, so I'd do it at the correct time for a couple hundred students. Then course would start, and after handling the invariable bunch of people wanting stuff I would sup till lunchtime at 11:30. Lunch was 30 minutes, plenty of time. The food was usually fairly good.

Staff rollcall again after lunch. This muster usually went on for a bit, like 30 minutes. We might do team drilling or Chinese School. I got to study for 2 or 3 hours after that, and maybe do some courseroom admin.

Dinner was 5:30 - 6:00, again, plenty of time to eat. There was a course running in the evening. After course ended at 10 pm then we got to do cleaning of the area or whatever other "must be done" cycles there were. Sometimes there would be some emergency or mission or we'd stay till 1 a.m. for months on end, but this is the mundane version, so none of that was going on. The usual bus left at 11:15pm to take us back to our berthing. I'd usually stay up for an hour sitting in a little curtained-off area at the back of the dorm where there were a couple of chairs and we could have a light on without disturbing people sleeping. I'd read a book or something, then go to bed around 12:30.

Repeat. For most of the ten years that I was in LA I got full pay, $30 a week when I arrived in 1986. It felt like an affluence compared to earlier times in the UK of getting nothing or a couple of pounds a week.

It got much worse sometimes, but there were times when a typical day did go as I detailed, with no real traumas to speak of. I'm sure others will detail far more traumatic days than I have, and might even ask "What Sea Org were you in?" :). At the same time I wrote of, people in different orgs but in the same building might have been having a far worse time of it than I did.

Paul

Feral
6th February 2010, 03:24 AM
OK, not a day but a snapshot of a six month check post GAT at Flag.

This is a generic version and has the best and worst of all of the trips.

So from Sydney to LA it was a 12 to 14 hour flight depending on which way. Would get to LA and wait for a connecting flight, often it was two flights to get to Tampa. This made a total of three planes to catch.

I'd usually arrive late at night with my eyes hanging out of my head, collect my bags and wait for the Flag Hotel bus to come and pick me up with the other new arrivals from all round the world.

I'd get to the Sandcastle and be told that the room they called me about 'pre booking' three times or more was not available for me, they also noticed that I had "accomo credits" as an FSM and they could relieve me of about 4 weeks of credits in two nights by putting me up in the room that Tom Cruise usually uses. Apparently the bed is so good that they have numerous "success stories" from people that have slept in it. I tell them, "No" put me up in the cheapest room you have until my room at the Sand castle. The reging continues for another half hour, see, they have a stat and the more of the money I consume on my accomos account (which is pre paid) the more stats they get. Finally I have had enough and say, "look, I'll just go and stay off base until you have a room" and then they suddenly find me a cheap room in the Fort Harrison. A bus comes and picks me up and I go to the desk to check in, by now it's around 1AM and I'm not just tired and dirty but harassed as well. I'm told that the "MLO" (medical liaison officer) will be down to check me out, please can I fill in this survey. The survey asks if I'm epileptic, have lice or any life threatening condition. Within 5 or so minutes the MLO arrives, she was obviously asleep, she reads my answers and takes a look at me. Approves my staying in the hotel and goes back to bed. It's now around 2AM and I can shower and sleep, a porter helps me up to the room.

I get up after as much sleep as I can get and go to breakfast to find out my food account hasn't been activated so I'm sent to hotel treasury to get money that I paid on my accomos account put on my food account, "would I like to upgrade my package?", here we go, "NO, I want to eat breakfast" after some wrangling I get him to put some money on the food account and go and eat.

I go to the sandcastle reception and pick up my routing form, the receptionist wants to know if I own the congresses and marks my answer on the form as well as my IAS status.

Experience has told me that I will not be leaving until the CS and RTC says I can and I won't be even on the line up to start my sec check until I've routed in, my first day is dedicated to that, and I plan to do all the steps necessary to accomplish this and to be "sessionable" for the next day as I've tried to arrive at a quiet time for Flag I'm praying that they'll have an auditor to take me for lots of sessions so I can get the sec check over with.

For today I need to check in with the solo HGC and hand in my confidential material which I've had on my person the WHOLE time until now in a sealed tough bag inside a plain brown envelope inside my locked briefcase. My solo DofP sees me and gives me some instructions. I then go and do an OCA, IQ test and aptitude test. By now the IAS body reg is following me everywhere as is the Super Power reg, they have a special briefing that I have to hear RIGHT NOW. I fob them off, over and over again but they keep coming back.

Next step is ethics where I'll get ethics clearance to do the refresher. It was metered and I was asked lots of questions about sex, the church, finances and more, she picks up on a dirty needle, there's no way out, I admit to having masturbated while my wife was on her refresher and gone for three weeks. I get a reading assignment on the evils of masturbation. Great. The MAA was a 15 year old girl, young enough to be my daughter.

I get my test results at the regular HGC and the DofP gives me a "tech estimate, 12.5 to 25 hrs to do my sec check plus a "pledge" intensive of 12.5. I get sent to the reg, she says, "Bad news, you only have two and a half intensives on account (at $7K per 12.5 he block) you'll need another intensive to cover this" after a lot of back and forth I convince her, through a war of attrition and the fact there is now a line of 5 more people for her to reg outside, that I don't have to and can't pay her right now. She signs me off and I go to treasury, more bad news, it's now there policy that they wont service me unless I have a whole 6 months of CSing forward paid, I only have 5 mths. I need to give him a check for $1700 US. I'm getting pissed by now, it must be jet lag, I decide to tell him "no" as well and I argue the lack of fairness of this, I also say I should be finished this time as I've been on the treadmill for 14 years, no he wants money, it gets intense with both of us holding our ground, a long line is forming behind me and we've been at this for half an hour when he relents, I'm signed off and get sent up to the HGC to get my sec check. I'm told by the board IC to be sessionable and to be back tomorrow.

Being experienced I go and sit down with the others who are getting the sec checks, I innocently ask, "How long before you started?" 5 days answered one, "OK" how many sessions a day you getting?" "One" she says. I then find out shes been here a week and is less than half way through. OK.

I pick up my form, I Now got to see the host but the IAS body reg walks in looking for me, I look like I'm in a hurry and walk off double paced while reading my routing form, I go to the Host's office and wait, there are people in front of me, I wait to see her. Her function is to welcome you to Flag and tell you not to complain too much about waiting, but should you need to complain come to her. She is a personal rep of LRH and is very senior, part of the CMO.

It's getting late by now and the jet lag is setting in. I decide to go to bed, as I come out of her office the IAS reg is waiting for me. She has to see me NOW, I need to be briefed on the latest attack from the SPs and psychs I'm tired and weak and some how get dragged down stairs, the body reg is cute and has big tits. I sit down and find they have two reges and a phone hook up for me, they give me coffee and start telling me what plans and actions the enemy have, it's dire, that's for sure and an hour later I'm told I can stop it all for $10K. "No, I'm not in a position to pay that kind of money I need to sleep to be sessionable", "What about your eligibility?, you need to be contributing to stay on the level" It goes on for as long as the reges feel they have a shot. Walking out on them would see me sent to ethics again so I work on ending it amicably. So I have to hold my ground in the face of anything they hit me with till they're out of ammo.

It's 2AM and get out of there, shower and go to bed wishing I was at home with my wife and daughter.

That's day one, if it's popular I'll do the whole two week stay.

Sharone Stainforth
6th February 2010, 03:34 AM
Not sure what is typical, but this was on the ApollO in 1968:

At about 6am/ 6:30am the Master at arms would come around the decks yelling and beating his baton on the side of the ships walls and cabin doors. The noise was horrific and jolted you out of a deep sleep, He would be yelling that we had 15 minutes till roll call. You had to get washed and dressed really quickly and rush up to what I think was called the poop deck.

I'm pretty sure we had the overboardings first then the orders of the day. Some days there were a lot of people for roll call, others there wern't so many. Not sure why.The overboadingd were horrific. Every god damned day, and some were worse than others.

Imagine waking up to that every morning, youv'e no idea really unless you were there.It was made to look like some kind of ceremony, like it was important and perfectly normal, only it wasn't. It was sick and every day you think " please don't let my name be called out, please don't let my name be called out", and the relief when it wasn't was what kept you going till the next day.

If on occasion LRH was attending, then you knew it was really serious, you just knew.And he thought it was funny,something to laugh about.

After roll call and whatever the orders of the day were, you could go for breakfast, which consisted of porridge, greasy eggs, toast. That is all I remember of breakfast.

The Commadores messengers had a sort of office, that was kind of a thorough fare through to other offices. I had a desk, I used to sit at and fill in forms.Can't remember what exactly.There was an in tray, a pending and an out tray. All mail for LRH came via the messengers. A lot of stuff had to be filed in filing cabinets.

I remember a female officer coming round and saying we were about to go to sea. Everything that moved had to be battoned down. 'batton down the hatches' comes to mind. Once I forgot something and the table started to move. It was reiterated everything has to be tied down.That was a rough sea that day.

There were days that you got a little bit of time to commune on one of the decks and chat to friends, other days you hardly saw anyone that you could speak to.

Working for the Commadore was a serious bussiness, you had to turn up looking smart, more often than not I got the evening duty. That could be pretty boring, sitting or standing around waiting for orders.Some nights you would find yourself running back and forth, either getting someone or delivering a message. Most often LRH would be in his office, recording or on other occasions he would be in a cabin auditing. Other times when there was a nice evening we would walk the decks and he would stop and talk to people.

If he got an audience, he would stop and tell stories and everyone was really taken with him, but there were times he really lost it and he could bellow, really loud and the whole ship would know about it.

I often worked till really late at night and then it was time for muster again.

So which sea org where you in Paul, it dosn't sound the same as the one I knew.

The woman Julia Salmon, I don't know if that was her name but there was a woman, about the same age I am now and she was absolutely terrified, totally besides herself about having to jump. There was a door that opened off of the deck and sometimes, not always, people were expected to jump off of their own free will. I don't know which was worse, being thrown over or jumping, but whatever it was, it was what you faced every morning.

I'm pretty sure it was the same woman, there was a lady about the same age, who was pushed out of the loading bay door . The idea was to get her to overcome her fear of the water. I was there at the time with another messenger. She had a life jacket on, but she was really upset and did not want to go into the water but she was made to anyway.

HelluvaHoax!
6th February 2010, 03:58 AM
I love this thread!

I was going to write a delightful parody of "A Day In The Life of a Scientologist"

But I could not do it and wasn't sure exactly why.

Then I realized that I also really, truly hate this thread because it vividly reminds me that--

ScientologyWorld is a very dark & disgraceful place that has absolutely nothing to do with your welfare, survival or happiness.

I am (literally) just shaking my head, thinking about it...swimming in an unexpected flood of emotion.

Feral
6th February 2010, 04:07 AM
I love this thread!

I was going to write a delightful parody of "A Day In The Life of a Scientologist"

But I could not do it and wasn't sure exactly why.

Then I realized that I also really, truly hate this thread because it vividly reminds me that--

ScientologyWorld is a very dark & disgraceful place that has absolutely nothing to do with your welfare, survival or happiness.

I am (literally) just shaking my head, thinking about it.

I was surprised at how my post went to be honest.

After writing it I felt tired and gutted.

To think I thought I was inhibited by my BTs when it was the OTs (org thetans) that were holding me away from my goals and true desires.

Luckily I finally blew all those org thetans and I'm so relieved I could line charge. It felt like I pulled a 200 lb parasite off my back.:happydance:

HelluvaHoax!
6th February 2010, 04:25 AM
I was surprised at how my post went to be honest.After writing it I felt tired and gutted.To think I thought I was inhibited by my BTs when it was the OTs (org thetans) that were holding me away from my goals and true desires.Luckily I finally blew all those org thetans and I'm so relieved I could line charge. It felt like I pulled a 200 lb parasite off my back.:happydance:

As I began reading the posts on this thread, I felt something stirring...

But, Feral, as I crawled thru the moment-by-moment of your amazingly vivid post, I re-connected with the ugly reality of Scientology that I had long ago jettisoned.

Not only did I not have a whimsical cell left in my body after reading that, there was a surge of recognition that came over me---along with a "flood of emotion" (which I went back and noted at the tail end of my earlier post).

This was a stunning moment that I have never experienced in posting here on ESMB. The only emotion I ever had, previously, was just the fun & freedom of it all to hang out with all of you guys here and to say whatever the fuck came to mind!

I guess it took 13 months and 1500 posts (and this thread with your poignant description) to explode a new depth of understanding into plain view.

Thanks!
HH

Feral
6th February 2010, 04:45 AM
Shit!, I hope I haven't spoiled the fun.

One thing is for sure though; Scientology, it's always worse than you think!

HelluvaHoax!
6th February 2010, 05:03 AM
Shit!, I hope I haven't spoiled the fun.
One thing is for sure though; Scientology, it's always worse than you think!

Hell No! The fusebreaker worked and now the fun button is is back on--with a party-like vengence! :D

And, oh yeah, I got a sneak peek at the first chapter of your upcoming book History of Scientology Man which began....

"This is a cold blooded and factual account of your last 76 trillion losses in Scientology."

Miss Pert
6th February 2010, 05:55 AM
Here is the basic rundown in a day in the life of an OOT (Outer Org Trainee) at Flag. This is based on the earlier part of my stay, it changed a bit over the 22 months I was there.

6:30am wake and muster with the other 3-400 OOTs in the carpark of one of the hotels mocked up as berthing. Spend next 15 or so minutes doing exercises, star jumps, push-ups, sit ups (not a lot of fun on an ashphalt), etc, then finally we get to back to our rooms for "personal grooming" time prior to going into the base. Beds are made and a final check of the room is made to be sure that there is absolutely nothing left sitting around, a tissue left on the dresser can get you an ethics chit and a $1.00 fine, as security inspects rooms for cleanliness daily.

7:10am I line up for the bus to take us to the base for breakfast, a choice of dry and not very fluffy scrambled eggs, fried eggs (I'm allergic to eggs, thank god), toasted muesli (yuk), yoghurt, or porridge, sorry, oatmeal which is so thin and watery it should actually be called gruel.

After breakfast we all muster again at the FH auditorium where we are all accounted for and the execs that run OOTs then go through who is going to complete a course that day, who is definitely going to do so and who isn't. Those who aren't are grilled on what they will do to "make it go right" to comp and then told to go back into line with the others. Muster is run in a militart fashion, we are lined up an arms length from the person next us and in front of us and we stand at attention until told otherwise. Once we have determined who is completing we then get to do "close order drilling," this is where the exec shouts commands like "right face" "left face" "attention" etc as we, as a group, follow these commands. At first this shocked me but after a while I started to enjoy it as it was closest thing to dancing available to me. This drilling and/or speed drills were done until it was time to head to the Coachman for study.

9:00am (for most students) arrive in courseroom in time for rollcall and start to study. At 11:55 "that's it" is called and public go to lunch while the OOTs muster, yet again, in the atrium of the Coachman building, everyone is accounted for and CO Coachman addresses us and we are dismissed to clean the building for the nex half an hour.

9:00am (for me and others whose org couldn't afford to pay for accomos) muster for workstudy, get assigned to a post either assisting housekeeping at FH, Sandcastle or the Yachtsman, washing dishes in one of the kitchens, gardening etc. We went straight from workstudy to lunch. I was normally doing housekeeping but in the end held the dishwashing post at the Oak Cove, which I must admit I actually enjoyed.

12:30pm lunch at last, again for me it's not particularly edible (in all fairness I have to tell you I am a fussy eater), and I go to the little shop next door to the Coachman and have a couple protein shakes. This is actually considered out-ethics as we are expected to eat as a group and not go elsewhere at lunchtime.

1:00pm back on course until 3:30pm when students that are upstat and on target for the day are allowed to take a 15min break for food/drink/ciggy, this is NOT a time to socialise just for the hell of it, if you do not require food etc you are expected to remain on course. Yeah right!

4:00pm back on course until 5:55pm

6:00pm muster at the Clearwater Building (CB) where we are again all accounted for and we go over who has managed to comp so far that day and once again go over who will comp by the end of the night. We may chinese school the ten points of KSW 1 or something similar before ending muster and being dismissed for dinner.

6:30pm dinner, if muster happens to run a bit late, tough, instead of 30mins you get 20 or 15mins. You are not to be late for for course.

7:00pm back on course, at 10:00pm "that's it" is called, the public leave, OOTS are technically allowed to leave but are actually expected to stay until 11:00 at least. If you're a comp for the day you are expected to stay until you comp.

10:00/11:00pm stand in line for buses to take us back to berthing. A bus arrives and you risk life and limb trying to get on the bus along with the 100 hundred students waiting to get THAT bus. If you are at the front of the line, or happen to be in the place so that you're lined up with the back doors, you have no choice but to get on the bus as the surge of bodies is so full on you are almost crushed by it. The bus is then packed so full that the doors can barely close. It's more like being among a pack of animals than a group of responsible adults representing their "church."

10:30pm-1:00am you arrive back at your berthing, if you're lucky like me you only share with 5 other people, and try to be the first to get in the shower so you can get to bed. Otherwise you wait until you can get your turn, it's a good idea to get over any considerations about showering, or going to the toilet in private, this does not happen, there is often a person in the shower, one on the toilet and another trying to clean teeth or take off makeup in one small space.

11:00pm-1:30am you finally get to bed for as much sleep as you can get before starting all over again the next day.

Note: By the time I left last year, morning exercise had been stopped, a portion of the students were expectd to be at the base at 6:30am where they would do call-in for Basics sales until 8:00am, these OOTs were allowed to leave course at 10pm, so long as they weren't comps, and go back to berthing. The other students that didn't go early finished course at 10pm but then had to do call-in for Basics sales until midnight but were not expected to be at the base until around 7:30am.

Thrak
6th February 2010, 08:01 AM
OK, not a day but a snapshot of a six month check post GAT at Flag.

This is a generic version and has the best and worst of all of the trips.

So from Sydney to LA it was a 12 to 14 hour flight depending on which way. Would get to LA and wait for a connecting flight, often it was two flights to get to Tampa. This made a total of three planes to catch.

I'd usually arrive late at night with my eyes hanging out of my head, collect my bags and wait for the Flag Hotel bus to come and pick me up with the other new arrivals from all round the world.

I'd get to the Sandcastle and be told that the room they called me about 'pre booking' three times or more was not available for me, they also noticed that I had "accomo credits" as an FSM and they could relieve me of about 4 weeks of credits in two nights by putting me up in the room that Tom Cruise usually uses. Apparently the bed is so good that they have numerous "success stories" from people that have slept in it. I tell them, "No" put me up in the cheapest room you have until my room at the Sand castle. The reging continues for another half hour, see, they have a stat and the more of the money I consume on my accomos account (which is pre paid) the more stats they get. Finally I have had enough and say, "look, I'll just go and stay off base until you have a room" and then they suddenly find me a cheap room in the Fort Harrison. A bus comes and picks me up and I go to the desk to check in, by now it's around 1AM and I'm not just tired and dirty but harassed as well. I'm told that the "MLO" (medical liaison officer) will be down to check me out, please can I fill in this survey. The survey asks if I'm epileptic, have lice or any life threatening condition. Within 5 or so minutes the MLO arrives, she was obviously asleep, she reads my answers and takes a look at me. Approves my staying in the hotel and goes back to bed. It's now around 2AM and I can shower and sleep, a porter helps me up to the room.

I get up after as much sleep as I can get and go to breakfast to find out my food account hasn't been activated so I'm sent to hotel treasury to get money that I paid on my accomos account put on my food account, would I like to upgrade my package, here we go, "NO, I want to eat breakfast" after some wrangling I get him to put some money on the food account and go and eat.

I go to the sandcastle reception and pick up my routing form, the receptionist wants to know if I own the congresses and marks my answer on the form as well as my IAS status.

Experience has told me that I will not be leaving until the CS and RTC says I can and I won't be even on the line up to start my sec check until I've routed in, my first day is dedicated to that, and I plan to do all the steps necessary to accomplish this and to be "sessionable" for the next day as I've tried to arrive at a quiet time for Flag I'm praying that they'll have an auditor to take me for lots of sessions so I can get the sec check over with.

For today I need to check in with the solo HGC and hand in my confidential material which I've had on my person the WHOLE time until now in a sealed tough bag inside a plain brown envelope inside my locked briefcase. My solo DofP sees me and gives me some instructions. I then go and do an OCA, IQ test and aptitude test. By now the IAS body reg is following me everywhere as is the Super Power reg, they have a special briefing that I have to hear RIGHT NOW. I fob them off, over and over again but they keep coming back.

Next step is ethics where I'll get ethics clearance to do the refresher. It was metered and I was asked lots of questions about sex, the church, finances and more, he picks up on a dirty needle, there's no way out, I admit to having masturbated while my wife was on her refresher and gone for three weeks. I get a reading assignment on the evils of masturbation. Great. The MAA was a 15 year old girl, young enough to be my daughter.

I get my test results at the regular HGC and the DofP gives me a "tech estimate, 12.5 to 25 hrs to do my sec check plus a "pleg" intensive of 12.5. I get sent to the reg, she says, "Bad news, you only have two and a half intensives on account (at $7K per 12.5 he block) you'll need another intensive to cover this" after a lot of back and forth I convince her, through a war of attrition and the fact there is now a line of 5 more people for her to reg outside, that I don't have to and can't pay her right now. She signs me off and I go to teasury, more bad news, it's now there policy that they wont service me unless I have a whole 6 months of CSing forward paid, I only have 5 mths. I need to give him a check fir $1700 US. I'm getting pissed by now, it must be jet lag, I decide to tell him "no" as well and I argue the lack of fairness of this, I also say I should be finished this time as I've been on the treadmill for 14 years, no he wants money, it gets intense with both of us holding our ground, a long line is forming behind me and we've been at this for half an hour when he relents, I'm signed off and get sent up to the HGC to get my sec check. I'm told by the board IC to be sessionable and to be back tomorrow.

Being experienced I go and sit down with the others who are getting the sec checks, I innocently ask, "How long before you started?" 5 days answered one, "OK" how many sessions a day you getting?" "One" she says. I then find out shes been here a week and is less than half way through. OK.

I pick up my form, I Now got to see the host but the IAS body reg walks in looking for me, I look like I'm in a hurry and walk off double paced while reading my routing form, I go to the Host's office and wait, there are people in front of me, I wait to see her. Her function is to welcome you to Flag and tell you not to complain too much about waiting, but should you need to complain come to her. She is a personal rep of LRH and is very senior, part of the CMO.

It's getting late by now and the jet lag is setting in. I decide to go to bed, as I come out of her office the IAS reg is waiting for me. She has to see me NOW, I need to be briefed on the latest attack from the SPs and psychs I'm tired and weak and some how get dragged down stairs, the body reg is cute and has big tits. I sit down and find they have two reges and a phone hook up for me, they give me coffee and start telling me what plans and actions the enemy have, it's dire, that's for sure and an hour later I'm told I can stop it all for $10K. "No, I'm not in a position to pay that kind of money I need to sleep to be sessionable", "What about your eligibility?, you need to be contributing to stay on the level" It goes on for as long as the reges feel they have a shot. Walking out on them would see me sent to ethics again so I work on ending it amicably. So I have to hold my ground in the face of anything they hit me with till they're out of ammo.

It's 2AM and get out of there, shower and go to bed wishing I was at home with my wife and daughter.

That's day one, if it's popular I'll do the whole two week stay.

Lucky for me I only had one trip to "Flag" and I could never stomach going there again. It's amazing at how much annoyance people can be taught to tolerate and how "donations" of tens of thousands of dollars can become routine. Thank God it's over.

Sharone Stainforth
6th February 2010, 01:52 PM
A typical unday.

Re on the Apollo 1968:

Sit down and eat breakfast with your family, never happened.Did I see my Dad at muster, No, a real rarity, don't know why that was.

Go to school and learn about maths, english, writing, science, domestic education.No.These were not considered necessary.Word clear scientology words were a must, didn't understand them.

Learnt to tie a slip knot, did this ever come in handy later in life. Invaluable.

Lunch, always queues waiting to get some food. Never enough time to wait in the queue, didn't occur to me to jump the queue, but my friend dived in and grabbed some food, which we ate on the hoof. Would have missed lunch otherwise.

So what about hygene? No one to remind me to brush my teeth. Did it sometimes when I remembered and wasn't too tired. Had a small wash basin in the cabin which we used to wash. On occasion got a shower. Not often.

Periods, girls have them. Didn't really know what one was. Fortunately it didn't happen on the ship. Later when back in England and they started still didn't really know what one was. Freaked out. Scientologist stepmother sent me to the shop to buy my own pads, said I had to take responcibility for it. Took me a while to deal with this. What did I learn from this, made sure my girls knew about periods long before they had them, made sure I bought the necessarys up until they were 16 years old at least.

Sex education, there wasn't any. Apart from some pornographic magazines I had seen at "Coopers Wood" pre sea org, so aged 10, didn't have a clue.

Not sure how this manifested, have a feeling it stemmed form secretly stealing bananas and ice cream from the officers mess.After leaving the sea org had a thing about squirreling away food and eating secretly, had this problem up until I had my first child. It was mainly comfort eating.I did sit down and eat meals with other people,but just had to eat secretly as well. Worried I'd get caught.It was almost like eating was a crime.

Hmm, never thought I'd write these things down, just a few thoughts that have come to mind recently.

I told you I was trouble
6th February 2010, 03:42 PM
Reading these posts had quite an effect on me too (as you mentioned HH) ... and that combined with having just finished reading Marc Headley's book (Blown for good) has left me feeling bereft and slightly strange for a little while even though it is many years since I experienced any of the hopelessness and degradation that I always felt when closely involved in anything to do with scientology, and particularly the SO.

We all became "actors" IMO and the staff were/are possibly the best actors of all. Always acting as if everything was "OK" when it was not "OK" at all.It was inhuman and diabolical and lives have been and are still being wrecked.

Feral, your post especially, has stunned me ... how ever did you tolerate it?

zeropointreference ... BFG's book gives all the detail you could ever want and is also (somehow) really funny and enjoyable to read despite the tragedy that it is documenting for a period of 15 years while being in the SO and in close proximity to David Miscavige.

This is (yet another) of those 'thank Gawd we are out moments' ... but I think my thoughts are going to remain with those still trapped in those soulless chaotic hellholes called 'orgs' for quite a while.

Damn you hubbard and damn you miscavige ... you are both a disgrace to the human race.

:no:

La La Lou Lou
6th February 2010, 07:46 PM
This thread should come with a public health warning!

Excellent and cathartic I'm sure it is in the long run. Right now I feel angry, upset and disgusted. What pointless waist of young vibrant lives.

I want a refund of my youth, I gave to to them and now I want it back. No compensation I can think of would make amends.

I couldn't do a day in my life in the SO, no way. I would be physically sick!

wiseman_of_the_watchtower
6th February 2010, 09:03 PM
Typical day at CLO Canada 2008, During the Basics Sales Evolution.

830am - Wake up, climb down from the second bunk of my bunk bed, get dressed etc.

850am - leave the berthing, walk 10 mins to the org/CLO.

900am - breakfast for 30 mins. eggs, toast and oatmeal. Nobody to talk to, as they are either half asleep or too grouchy to talk. A couple of people reading the free newspaper, usually the entertainment section, or doing the crossword puzzle.

930am - we all go to the CTO (course room) where the sup calls out names, and we call back "aye, Sir" to her, or just "Aye" if we are the same or higher rank. The sup calls out "Ready to start? Start!"

1pm - study over, lunch time. Tuna sandwiches on toast. People are more alive now, but not really talking to each other. A lot of people leave to buy cheap junk food.

130pm - another muster, this time in the cafeteria. The girl calling out names finishes, and then it is the COs turn. He asks "any announcements?" then reminds us we need to make $50,000 this week. He says "Let's have a very productive day", then he just says "Start" because he's tired of asking us over and over again.

130pm - 6pm - post. What we did depended on our post, but most of the time was dedicated to calling public to sell them this $3500.00 package of books and CDs. Actually our posts didn't matter too much as long as we 'got products' on sales.

6pm - 1215am - more time on post. Some of us are lucky and go straight home. Anybody on sales stays to 130am and ends off with a sales meeting/planning names to sell tomorrow. Ext Comm Chf, FBO MORE and Snr Comm Off stay up to 230am every day.

-Wiseman of the Watchtower

HelluvaHoax!
6th February 2010, 09:08 PM
------snipped----------

....those soulless chaotic hellholes called 'orgs' ....



Hmmmm, that is a rather succinct, truthful description that I don't recall seeing in any of the billion promo pieces that orgs sent me.

Wondering now...maybe that's why Scientology is so obsessed with asserting there are countless souls trapped within one's body? So you don't notice that your own soul has been taken?

Feral
6th February 2010, 10:23 PM
130pm - 6pm - post. What we did depended on our post, but most of the time was dedicated to calling public to sell them this $3500.00 package of books and CDs. Actually our posts didn't matter too much as long as we 'got products' on sales.

WMWT, that is a frightening turn of events within the Cof$.

Were you fairly new?, I ask because once, before the GAK, it was unspeakable to put your post behind anything at all. This could be the clearest window into DM's crazed mind, showing just what he's done to destroy corporate Scientology with his pet money making projects.

Kutta
6th February 2010, 10:29 PM
I think there is one word that would cover all the posts here, except maybe Paul's. It is degradation. Of the human spirit. Reading Miss Pert's account of the "right turn", "left turn" commands at Flag, reminded me of one time at SHUK when some Flag missionaires had us staff lined up and ordered us, for some reason, to call out, not our names, but giving ourselves numbers. It was a wonderful surreal moment, because we all as one, balked at doing that, and the missionaires backed off. There must have been sufficient human spirit remaining in us to refuse to be classified in this way. I distinctly recall that I thought at the time that the situation carried echoes of lining up and dehumanizing holocaust victims.

Feral
6th February 2010, 10:34 PM
Feral, your post especially, has stunned me ... how ever did you tolerate it?

.........

Damn you hubbard and damn you miscavige ... you are both a disgrace to the human race.

:no:

Weird eh? Remember we'd drunk the kool-aid and we were on the "Bridge to Total Freedom" by the time this started I'd had a huge investment, spiritually and financially in going 'free'.

I internalized the reality that I just had to navigate this madness and get to where I was going......... which ended up being nowhere.

wiseman_of_the_watchtower
7th February 2010, 12:03 AM
WMWT, that is a frightening turn of events within the Cof$.

Were you fairly new?, I ask because once, before the GAK, it was unspeakable to put your post behind anything at all. This could be the clearest window into DM's crazed mind, showing just what he's done to destroy corporate Scientology with his pet money making projects.

You still were accountable for your stats on a Thursday at 2:00, but during the week, the only thing you could do other then post was to be making calls to sell the Basics. That, you wouldn't get in trouble for.

Unless they didn't buy.

-Wiseman of the Watchtower

Dulloldfart
7th February 2010, 12:06 AM
I think there is one word that would cover all the posts here, except maybe Paul's. It is degradation. Of the human spirit. Reading Miss Pert's account of the "right turn", "left turn" commands at Flag, reminded me of one time at SHUK when some Flag missionaires had us staff lined up and ordered us, for some reason, to call out, not our names, but giving ourselves numbers. It was a wonderful surreal moment, because we all as one, balked at doing that, and the missionaires backed off. There must have been sufficient human spirit remaining in us to refuse to be classified in this way. I distinctly recall that I thought at the time that the situation carried echoes of lining up and dehumanizing holocaust victims.

I had the degrading occasions too, more so in the US than the UK, sometimes for weeks or months on end, but it wasn't all the time. I could have written many different versions of a typical day, but figured most people would pick the bad times they had, and wanted a contrast to balance it up a bit. Just a bit.

In the UK most of us had probably seen "The Prisoner" TV series, with Patrick McGoohan famously, and defiantly, yelling out, "I am not a number, I am a free man!"

Paul

HelluvaHoax!
7th February 2010, 12:55 AM
In the UK most of us had probably seen "The Prisoner" TV series, with Patrick McGoohan famously, and defiantly, yelling out, "I am not a number, I am a free man!"


That's funny Paul, exactly what ran thru my mind as I was reading it too!

HUBBARD'S CHART OF HUMAN DE-VALUATION (simplified)

I am not a static, I am a thetan!

I am not a thetan I am a man!

I am not a man I am an org stat number.

I am not a number I am a free man! (Homo Blowus)

(Thank God I am a man again! I think if it's okay with Ron I'll just take my win at this point and collect up all my chips and cash out. What's that? Ohhhh, no thanks, Ron....I think I'll pass on that great opportunity to win the OT jackpot. But thanks anyway, I'm good to go here. See ya, dude!)

practice
7th February 2010, 01:03 AM
I love this thread! :thumbsup:

I was never in the sea org myself, but I came damn close to it. I always wonder what my life would have been like if I had actually made the plunge. I like Paul's post most of all.

I told you I was trouble
7th February 2010, 04:25 AM
Weird eh? Remember we'd drunk the kool-aid and we were on the "Bridge to Total Freedom" by the time this started I'd had a huge investment, spiritually and financially in going 'free'.

I internalized the reality that I just had to navigate this madness and get to where I was going......... which ended up being nowhere.


Yes ... I understand Feral ... I was doing much the same thing.

:eyeroll:

I told you I was trouble
7th February 2010, 04:31 AM
Originally posted by HelluvaHoax

Hmmmm, that is a rather succinct, truthful description that I don't recall seeing in any of the billion promo pieces that orgs sent me.

:giggle:


Wondering now...maybe that's why Scientology is so obsessed with asserting there are countless souls trapped within one's body? So you don't notice that your own soul has been taken?


It could well be true ... the 'truth' is often silly and bat shite crazy.

:p

michaelangelo
16th July 2010, 08:41 PM
Fair enough. Here's a typical mundane day at ITO (International Training Org) around 1993. I was a course supervisor. It's a less interesting day — no huge emergency going on.

I'd wake up at 7:10 in a men's dorm. There was a minute "bathroom" in the dorm, toilet and sink, shared by the guys in the dorm. Most of the time there were maybe 8 guys in the dorm, but only 4 or 5 who got up at the same time. We had morning time slots assigned, 6 minutes each, to avoid squabbles (we arranged this schedule ourselves, it wasn't some order from above). So I'd use my 6 minutes to wash, shave etc. Then get dressed in my uniform, walk outside and around the corner, and get on a Sea Org bus with the rest of the guys. Then a ten minute drive through Hollywood, off the bus, upstairs in the Hollywood Guarantee Building 6th floor for breakfast, fairly leisurely (15 minutes or so). Then muster at 8:00 or 8:15, whenever it was. Roll-call to make sure we're all there, any special announcements from the CO, then off to post.

I was a staff courses sup. I was exceptionally good (fast and accurate) at calling roll, so I'd do it at the correct time for a couple hundred students. Then course would start, and after handling the invariable bunch of people wanting stuff I would sup till lunchtime at 11:30. Lunch was 30 minutes, plenty of time. The food was usually fairly good.

Staff rollcall again after lunch. This muster usually went on for a bit, like 30 minutes. We might do team drilling or Chinese School. I got to study for 2 or 3 hours after that, and maybe do some courseroom admin.

Dinner was 5:30 - 6:00, again, plenty of time to eat. There was a course running in the evening. After course ended at 10 pm then we got to do cleaning of the area or whatever other "must be done" cycles there were. Sometimes there would be some emergency or mission or we'd stay till 1 a.m. for months on end, but this is the mundane version, so none of that was going on. The usual bus left at 11:15pm to take us back to our berthing. I'd usually stay up for an hour sitting in a little curtained-off area at the back of the dorm where there were a couple of chairs and we could have a light on without disturbing people sleeping. I'd read a book or something, then go to bed around 12:30.

Repeat. For most of the ten years that I was in LA I got full pay, $30 a week when I arrived in 1986. It felt like an affluence compared to earlier times in the UK of getting nothing or a couple of pounds a week.

It got much worse sometimes, but there were times when a typical day did go as I detailed, with no real traumas to speak of. I'm sure others will detail far more traumatic days than I have, and might even ask "What Sea Org were you in?" :). At the same time I wrote of, people in different orgs but in the same building might have been having a far worse time of it than I did.

Paul
I cannot be bothered to go into detail of my Sea Org days. But Paul do you remember getting on the Sea Org bus from Stonelands and passing a lake on the way to Saint Hill ?. That's when I first joined in 76. Then after a few weeks the bus would go a different direction and not pass the lakes at all. It may seem mundane but it came into my mind the other day when a friend told me he went swimming in a lake in the Ashdown Forrest.