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Thread: Brain Games

  1. #11
    Crusader Mimsey Borogrove's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by strativarius View Post
    Yes, I see red, but very muted. Certainly not grey.



    These colours are identical.
    I see stuff like that a lot when I draw stuff in Sketchup. I can paint several surfaces the same color and as you rotate around the object the colors appear to change. And yes, I see the muted red as well. Mimsey

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  3. #12
    Oh, a wise guy,eh? F.Bullbait's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    The way our eyes perceive color makes it possible to use three colors - red, green, blue - to make us think we are seeing true (spectrum) color when it is really just a combination of these three colors. The color on your computer screen, tv, film are really just combinations of these three colors. A spectral analysis of this kind of color would only show these three color frequencies.

    For more on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RGB_color_model


    The foregoing pictures in this thread seem to fall outside this standard model.

    I gather that the red color perceived in the strawberries must be rather faint. I can't see it.

    As far as 'the dress' goes, I see gold and white (actually the white is bluish-grey but appropriate for white in shadow, by my reckoning)

    My wife sees black and blue. No way would I mistake gold for black!





    "Go to heaven for the climate and hell for the company." –Mark Twain

    "Religion and theology must not be confounded. Religion is not doctrine, but a new birth." - R. Falckenberg History of Modern Philosophy (on German mysticism).

  4. #13
    Crusader Mimsey Borogrove's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by F.Bullbait View Post
    The way our eyes perceive color makes it possible to use three colors - red, green, blue - to make us think we are seeing true (spectrum) color when it is really just a combination of these three colors. The color on your computer screen, tv, film are really just combinations of these three colors. A spectral analysis of this kind of color would only show these three color frequencies.

    For more on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RGB_color_model


    The foregoing pictures in this thread seem to fall outside this standard model.

    I gather that the red color perceived in the strawberries must be rather faint. I can't see it.

    As far as 'the dress' goes, I see gold and white (actually the white is bluish-grey but appropriate for white in shadow, by my reckoning)

    My wife sees black and blue. No way would I mistake gold for black!
    Ok what do you see here?

  5. #14
    Oh, a wise guy,eh? F.Bullbait's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by Mimsey Borogrove View Post
    Ok what do you see here?

    Ah, the color blindness test! 25,6,56,45,29,8.


    Thinking of RGB, what does an RGB display look like when you are Exterior with Visio?

    No body limitations there to fool you regarding what you sense as color, I would think.




    "Go to heaven for the climate and hell for the company." –Mark Twain

    "Religion and theology must not be confounded. Religion is not doctrine, but a new birth." - R. Falckenberg History of Modern Philosophy (on German mysticism).

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    Crusader Mimsey Borogrove's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by F.Bullbait View Post
    Ah, the color blindness test! 25,6,56,45,29,8.


    Thinking of RGB, what does an RGB display look like when you are Exterior with Visio?

    No body limitations there to fool you regarding what you sense as color, I would think.

    Or! Maybe they see in cyan, magenta and yellow? According to Hubbard they see in all of the wavelengths - full perception, which is how we can see through things while exterior. I haven't personally experienced that but a wog friend did when he popped out of his head. That would include IR and UV . I think some humans see slightly into those bands - I was talking to one of my nephew's friends who said he could see into the UV.

    Most patients going in for radical eye surgery hope the surgeons won't have an accident that makes their vision any worse.

    Some wake up to find they can see colors far beyond the range humans are normally able to see.

    There is increasing evidence that patients who have cataracts, cancer or other eye problems treated by having their corneas surgically removed and replaced with artificial alternatives, often end up able to see colors in the ultraviolet range of the spectrum – colors of light visible to night-hunting raptors, some lizards and, oddly, ants, but not to humans.

    If this were a comic book or science fiction novel, this is where you'd find descriptions of strange creatures visible only in ghostly purple light, strange doors undetectable those not afflicted by aphakia, whole civilizations and a really coherent plot involving a threat to the human race that can be foiled only by humans able to see into The Purple.

    Unfortunately, while the ability to see farther into the ultraviolet than other people is cool, it's not exactly a superpower. (It does do some really wacky things to the colors you're used to seeing, though.)

    The colors of light classified as ultraviolet are only one step above the normal human visual range, for one thing.

    Even un-aphakian humans can see some ultraviolet – which is used primarily to make raves and clubs look cool under black light (for the hipsters) or to identify bodily-fluid stains on sheets and furniture in hotel rooms (for the germophobes).

    While it's possible to see black-light lightbulbs and see the darkish cast they throw on objects that don't glow ultrawhite under them, most humans can't actually see the color of ultraviolet light.
    http://www.itworld.com/article/27325...traviolet.html

    Humans Can See Infrared Light, Scientists Say
    Dec 3, 2014 by News Staff / Source

    Human eyes can detect light at wavelengths in the visual spectrum; other wavelengths, such as infrared and ultraviolet, are supposed to be invisible, but an international group of scientists from Poland, Switzerland, Norway and the United States, has found that under certain conditions, it’s possible for humans to see infrared light. Using cells from the retinas of mice and people, and infrared lasers, the group found that when laser light pulses rapidly, light-sensing cells in the retina sometimes get a double hit of infrared energy. When that happens, the eye is able to detect light that falls outside the visible spectrum.
    http://www.sci-news.com/biology/scie...ght-02313.html

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  9. #16
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    That's interesting about seeing infra-red through a two-photon transition. It's theoretically plausible, with strong enough light.

    My red-green color vision is somewhat defective. I can distinguish Stop and Go traffic lights with no trouble, and I can only describe their difference as one being red while the other is green. They do not look at all like shades of the same color to me, or anything like that. And yet of those six discs full of dots making numbers, I can only see the 25. The other five patterns all just look like "a bunch of dots in various shades". I don't see the numbers at all. So I'm definitely missing something in my general experience of color. My best bet is that my color vision is a bit like being hard of hearing. When colors are loud and distinct, so to speak, I get what they are saying, but past a certain threshold of noise, I only get mumbles.

    Human color vision represents light in terms of just three intensities, which are the responses of three different light-sensitive molecules in our eyes. Compared to the full range of information that is present in electromagnetic waves, this is like listening to music that has been recorded in a compression scheme so radical that all tones are reproduced as just one of three pure notes. If we heard sound the way we see light, a piano would have three fat keys within the middle octave, and nothing else.

    There is a lot more to be seen in the world than we see. The reason astronomy can tell us so much about distant stars is that instruments can resolve all different frequencies of light very precisely, allowing us to go far beyond just seeing colors. Seeing colors is like hearing the difference between an A and C; with the much higher frequency resolution of human hearing, however, we can also recognize the complex patterns of overtones that make up musical timbre, so that a C on a trumpet sounds different from a C on a violin. In a similar way, optical instruments can see not just red and green, but hydrogen, helium, oxygen, etc. Hot gas made of different elements glows with distinctive combinations of frequencies.

    To beings who could see light with much higher frequency resolution than ours, the world would be a far richer-looking place. We are crude creatures blundering blindly through a world that we only barely even see. So I don't really feel so bad about my color vision. I'm only very slightly worse off than anyone else.

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  11. #17

    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by Student of Trinity View Post
    Human color vision represents light in terms of just three intensities, which are the responses of three different light-sensitive molecules in our eyes.
    Some women have four types of cone cells in their retinas, allowing them to see a different (richer) set of colors. The condition is called Tetrachromacy. Some birds, lizards, and mammals also have four-color vision, with cone cells sensitive to UV light.
    Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. -- Frederick Douglass

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  13. #18
    Comfortably Numb strativarius's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brain Games

    Quote Originally Posted by Mimsey Borogrove View Post
    According to Hubbard they see in all of the wavelengths - full perception, which is how we can see through things while exterior. <snip>
    I keep asking this question but I've yet to receive a satisfactory answer (or any answer come to that). Our eyes/brain interpret different wavelengths as different colours within the visible em spectrum. So how do disembodied thetans SEE colour (or SEE anything)?
    To err is human, to purr is feline - Alexander Pope

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