Help wanted - husband's payments to Church of Scientology (Cosreci)

Discussion in 'Welcome, Media People and Researchers, Ask Here fo' started by newcastlebrown, Jan 11, 2017.

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  1. Hi
    Sorry if this is not the right place but I just have a simple question and I hope someone can enlighten me.
    I have been doing my new year admin and notice on an old bank statement that my husband has made a one-off payment of £[amount] to "Cosreci", which I googled and obviously realised it is the church. Could someone explain what this could have been for, as we are not members (or at least not that I know about!)?
    Many thanks and sorry if this is inappropriate - this was the most likely place I could find :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  2. Enthetan

    Enthetan Mutant

    No idea. The better person to talk about this with is your husband.

    Either he authorized the payment, (and has been keeping his involvement in Scientology a secret from you) and you need to talk, or he didn't, and you are victims of fraud and need to notify the bank and the police.

    Either way, you need to discuss this with your husband today.

    The reason I say "today" is that by giving the exact amount, you have given Scientology (which monitors this board) enough data to probably figure out which transaction this was. In that case, if your husband is a secret Scientologist, they will be talking to him about how he can lie his way out of it. Best that YOU get to him before THEY do.
     
  3. Adam7986

    Adam7986 Declared SP

    It could be a strange coincidence. I agree with Enthetan that you should check with your husband. That is a significant amount of money. It sounds like, if it is really CORSECI, that he was tricked into signing up for Scientology. Either way, you need to have a conversation with him. He should have warned you that he was spending such a material amount of dough.
     
  4. Adam7986

    Adam7986 Declared SP

    Interestingly, this sounds like something a Scientologist would say. I'm not accusing you of being one at all. Just pointing out the strange coincidence.
     
  5. Leland

    Leland Crusader

    Speak to a lawyer and your bank immediately on how to stop your husband from taking money out of your bank accounts without your permission.
     
  6. Helena Handbasket

    Helena Handbasket Gold Meritorious Patron

    The best way to accomplish that, IMHO, is to open a new bank account in your name only.

    But that could be seen as an act of betrayal; as in, what are YOU doing that you want to stop HIM from spending your common exchequer?

    You don't want to be the first one to do something dodgy. Like Enthetan said, have a conversation with your husband.

    Helena
     
  7. ThetanExterior

    ThetanExterior Goldenrod SP

    You say it's an old bank statement and there is only one payment. That doesn't sound as if he's currently involved in scientology. Scientologists are constantly urged to pay money for all kinds of reasons.

    Maybe he was a scientology staff member at one time and he's paying off a Freeloader debt.
     
  8. Hypatia

    Hypatia Pagan


    Can't be done. She indicated that it's a joint account.

    Best future action would be for her to open and use a separate account in her name only.
     
  9. Thank you all. I mainly wanted to know if it was a standard sign up fee or something, it seems not as you guys don't recognize it. I'll ask him directly!
     
  10. prosecco

    prosecco Patron Meritorious

    I don't agree. It's a common phrase to use, especially in the New Year when lots of people, at least in the UK are getting their taxes together for the 31 January deadline.
     
  11. Jump

    Jump Operating teatime


    COSRECI is an entity used in the U.K. and Europe ( not USA). It funnels Scientology funds through an entity in South Australia, taking blatant cynical advantage of the generous taxation exemptions offered to religious organisations in that state.


    Edited to add:
    And by inference, stupidly offered equally to fake 'religious organisations'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2017
  12. Jump

    Jump Operating teatime


    Archival Australian news report including comment from Senator Nick Xenophon about the deceptive front COSRECI:

    [video=youtube;PJElyQXh9no]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJElyQXh9no[/video]



     
  13. Hypatia

    Hypatia Pagan

    It sounds like it could be money for a training or auditing package. I think they probably gave him a hard sell.
     
  14. AnonyMary

    AnonyMary Formerly Fooled - Finally Free

    Welcome, newcastlebrown!

    CORECI stands for Church of Scientology Religious Education College Inc.

    So, whatever money was paid to them, it was most likely a donation. For what? Your husband would have to tell you. I certainly hope, for your sake and that of your family, that it was his first and last payment to them.

    Here is a March 3, 2016 article from the Adelaide Now newspaper in Australia

    UK-based Church of Scientology Religious Education College Inc registered as charity in Adelaide

    EXCLUSIVE:, Tory Shepherd, The Advertiser

    BRITISH Scientologists collecting tens of millions of dollars are using an Adelaide address as a registered Australian charity, although it spends its money in the United Kingdom.

    The UK-based Church of Scientology Religious Education College Inc (COSRECI) is based in Pulteney St.

    Religious charities are eligible for a range of exemptions, but crucially being based in SA allows the COSRECI to try to avoid a 21 per cent corporation tax in the UK.

    It is not clear how successful the college has been in avoiding tax and its representatives were unable to answer questions yesterday.

    According to financial statements lodged with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, it made £10,805,637 (about AUD $21 million) in 2014 and £12,535,163 (about $24 million) in 2013.

    It lists its primary activity as “advancing religion” and its places of operation as South Australia and the UK.

    Scientology was established by science-fiction author L. Ron Hubbard. Devotees believe humans play host to immortal spirits called thetans, which have past lives.

    The independent auditor’s report confirms that the money is spent overseas.

    “The trustees have confirmed to us that the financial activities of CSRECI comprise solely the financial activities of the UK branch and therefore on this basis this report effectively covers the whole of the financial activities of COSRECI,” they say.

    They also declared about AUD $54 million in assets.

    “COSRECI was incorporated in SA as a religious charity, and is established in England for charitable purposes only,” the statements note.

    “The trustees consider that corporation tax should not therefore be applicable.”

    Possible future tax has been “provided for”, however.

    The group has been in Adelaide since 1977.

    The ACNC began in recent years to track charity dealings. [..] read on for more.....

    http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/...e/news-story/292436d3826b9360f16e6db9829e6f7b

    As you can see, its taken years for Australia to find this out. The efforts of Senator Nicholas "Nick" Xenophon, others former members and more recently like the late (and much missed) persistent former scientologist and church critic, Roland Rashleigh-Berry, helped reveal Scientology's legal shenanigans to avoid taxes in the UK by passing monies through CORECI in Australia.

    There are a number of informative threads about about CORECI on this forum. Here is a Google search result list of them.
    site:forum.exscn.net/ "Cosreci"

    Thank you for joining and posting about this. Let us know what he said, if possible.

    Best wishes,

    Mary McConnell
     
  15. thank you all, very kind.
     
  16. Thanks AnonyMary, I'll let you know what I can find out
     
  17. ok so he tells me it's for a personal development course, you know, like life coaching sort of thing, that happens to be run by them - he says of course it's nothing to do with signing up and he wouldn't be interested if it was. I'm extremely sceptical now, surely they are not going to run these sort of courses altruistically with no element of scientology involved? Is this how they first get people listening to their views? Might he have been trained to say this or do you think he is telling the truth?
     
  18. I told you I was trouble

    I told you I was trouble Suspended animation


    Oh dear ... he may well believe he is telling the truth ... but he has been conned, it's definitely a ploy/lie by the cofs, a tactic to suck people in to the cult of scientology.

    I don't want to scare you but it sounds as if they have their hooks into him and they won't let go easily ... he will need to be very strong and get out while he can.

    If he hasn't done the "service" yet he can demand a refund, he will get declared a "suppressive person" (and I expect you will too if your name is mentioned) ... but it's completely meaningless.

    Tell him not to discuss or negotiate with them at all ... he should just demand his money back (in writing) and run like hell.

    Good luck and please let us know how you are.

    :yes:
     
  19. Enthetan

    Enthetan Mutant

    If it's called "life coaching", it's more likely that he's scheduled to get auditing ("life repair").

    It's a bad sign that he's being evasive. Now, there is no "signing up" -- new public do not sign any agreements to be part of scientology and dedicate their lives to "clearing the planet". What happens is that, after each service, the person is under heavy pressure to lay out money for the next service.

    Charitably, he might be telling you what he's been told, and he might believe it himself. They might have actually told him it was "life coaching". The actual test will come after he's started it. If he's evasive about what actually goes on, take it as a warning that things are about to go badly.
     
  20. ThetanExterior

    ThetanExterior Goldenrod SP

    A "personal development course" for someone new to scientology would cost something like one hundred pounds - not the thousands of pounds you mentioned in your opening post (which you seem to have edited out).

    For someone to give them that kind of money they must be totally convinced about the subject therefore they are now a scientologist.
     

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